Wisconsin State officials kept silent on CWD discovery at game farm

Discussion in 'Wildlife Diseases' started by flounder, Apr 4, 2014.

  1. State officials kept silent on CWD discovery at game farm

    By Lee Bergquist of the Journal Sentinel April 4, 2014 6:25 p.m.

    A state agriculture official acknowledged Friday that a second case of chronic wasting disease at a shooting preserve in Marathon County turned up on Feb. 24, but the agency declined to publicize the discovery.

    The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection released a statement on the first case on Dec. 2. But State Veterinarian Paul McGraw said the agency opted not to inform the public of a second finding because it occurred on the same farm as the first.

    The first deer had been shot in November 2013. In the second case, agriculture officials on Friday said personnel were not available to locate records showing when the deer was killed.

    McGraw also said deer on the shooting preserve only leave one way — dead.

    The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel learned of the newest case from veterinarian and former Natural Resources Board member David Clausen of Amery.

    Events surrounding the finding also provide a rare glimpse of a recent tug-of-war over scientific issues between agencies under Gov. Scott Walker.

    The Department of Natural Resources has raised questions over disease transmission with its sister agency. Clausen also objected, specifically, to McGraw's suggestion that CWD could suddenly appear in a new location by a spontaneous occurrence.

    Clausensays the agriculture department should make all discoveries public because of the widespread interest in the fatal deer disease.

    Chronic wasting disease was discovered in western Dane County in 2002. The disease has since been found in 18 counties, both in the wild and on game farms. The state has spent more than $35 million to combat it since 2002.

    "I think the fact that they didn't release this one shows that CWD is not a particularly high priority for the department of agriculture," Clausen said.

    Clausen's term on the policy-setting board of the Department of Natural Resources expired in 2013. He has been critical of the DNR for not being aggressive enough in trying to control the spread of the disease.

    Clausen said he was frustrated with the agriculture department because chronic wasting disease inevitably spreads, its prevalence increases, "and there is always the chance of escape from a farm," Clausen said.

    The biggest outbreak on a deer farm occurred in Portage County, where 82 deer tested positive in 2006. The outbreak is believed to be the highest infection rate for a captive deer herd in the U.S. Authorities killed all of the deer in the herd, but not before officials discovered a hole in the fence and an estimated 30 deer escaped and were never found.

    Portage County has since had four positive cases of the disease.

    The disease is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, or TSE, caused by an infectious agent known as a prion and is spread by deer-to-deer contact and through a disease-contaminated environment such as soil.

    The prions invade the brains of deer and eventually cause them to waste away. There is no definitive research showing humans can be harmed from eating diseased deer, but health experts don't recommend it.

    McGraw agreed that more diseased deer are likely to be found at the shooting preserve, Wilderness Whitetails. But he said the agency doesn't routinely report new outbreaks of other diseases.

    "It was a deer born in that preserve and there had already been a positive in that preserve so it didn't change anything," McGraw said.

    In the first case, the deer that tested positive had greater contact with other deer because it lived for a time on a separate breeding farm. The agriculture department traced 81 deer to farms in Wisconsin and seven other states from the time the buck was housed there.

    McGraw contacted the DNR on Feb. 25, the day he learned of the lab results; he also contacted the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    In Wisconsin, the agriculture department regulates captive animals and the DNR regulates wildlife.

    "We didn't feel it was our place to make an announcement," said Tom Hauge, director of the bureau of wildlife management at the DNR. "Since they regulate captive cervid facilities, we try not to get in their sand box."

    The DNR routinely makes announcements when the disease reaches a new county in the wild, but not when there are new finds within the county, Hauge said.

    The initial discovery at Wilderness Whitetails was the first in five years. In trying to explain the sudden appearance, McGraw cited several possibilities for transmission, including the chance it occurred spontaneously.

    That drew attention of Clausen and wildlife staff at the DNR. Clausen said he knew of no peer-reviewed research showing the disease turned up that way.

    Tami Ryan, wildlife health section chief with the DNR, asked the agriculture department to back up the claim.

    Richard Bourie, a veterinarian, pointed to a paper by Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner of the University of California, San Francisco, who discussed spontaneous occurrence in TSEs.

    Ryan wrote back and said, "to the best of our collective knowledge, spontaneous CWD in wild deer has not been substantiated," although she said the DNR wasn't trying to pick a fight.

    Said McGraw: "There is no battle going on here. We all read science here. Everybody looks at different possibilities."

    http://www.jsonline.com/news/wiscon...overy-at-game-farm-b99240649z1-253975461.html

    Monday, December 02, 2013

    WISCONSIN CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD DISCOVERED MARATHON COUNTY HUNTING PRESERVE

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/12/wisconsin-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd.html

    Tuesday, December 17, 2013

    Wisconsin Second CWD positive deer found in Grant County

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/12/wisconsin-second-cwd-positive-deer.html

    Wisconsin : 436 Deer Have Escaped From Farms to Wild

    Date: March 18, 2003 Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Contacts: LEE BERGQUIST [email protected]

    State finds violations, lax record keeping at many sites, report says

    A state inspection of private deer farms, prompted by the discovery of chronic wasting disease, found that 436 white-tailed deer escaped into the wild, officials said Tuesday

    The Department of Natural Resources found that captive deer have escaped from one-third of the state's 550 deer farms over the lifetime of the operations. The agency also uncovered hundreds of violations and has sought a total of 60 citations or charges against deer farm operators.

    snip...

    CWD found on 2 farms

    Seven deer have tested positive for the disease on game farms - one on a Portage County farm and six on a Walworth County farm - since the disease was discovered in three wild deer killed near Mount Horeb in western Dane County. One deer that tested positive on the Walworth County farm escaped and roamed free for six months.

    snip...

    The audit found that most farms were in compliance, but the DNR found many violations and instances of poor record keeping. Also in numerous instances, fences did not stop wild and captive deer from intermingling.

    At least 227 farms conducted part of their business on a cash basis, making it hard to track animal movement with financial records.

    For example, both the Internal Revenue Service and the state Department of Revenue have been contacted about a deer farm near Wild Rose in Waushara County that is suspected of selling six large bucks for $45,000 in cash and not using live deer shipping tags as required.

    The DNR found that game farm operators have more deer in captivity than their records show, which is "due in part because the owners of a number of large deer farm operations were! unable to accurately count the number of deer within their fences," the audit found.

    Hundreds of deer escape

    The DNR found a total of 671 deer that escaped farms - 436 of which were never found - because of storm-damaged fences, gates being left open or the animals jumping over or through fences.

    In one example in Kewaunee County, a deer farmer's fence was knocked down in a summer storm. Ten deer escaped, and the farmer told the DNR he had no intention of trying to reclaim them. The DNR found five of the deer, killed them and cited the farmer for violation of a regulation related to fencing.

    Another deer farmer near Mishicot, in Manitowoc County, released all nine of his whitetails last summer after he believed the discovery of chronic wasting disease was going to drive down the market for captive deer.

    The DNR found 24 instances of unlicensed deer farms and issued 19 citations.

    Journal Sentinel correspondent Kevin Murphy contributed to this report.

    Game Farms Inspected

    A summary of the findings of the Department of Natural Resources' inspection of 550 private white-tailed deer farms in the state: The deer farms contained at least 16,070 deer, but the DNR believes there are more deer in captivity than that because large deer farms are unable to accurately count their deer. 671 deer had escaped from game farms, including 436 that were never found.

    24 farmers were unlicensed. One had been operating illegally since 1999 after he was denied a license because his deer fence did not meet minimum specifications.

    Records maintained by operators ranged from "meticulous documentation to relying on memory." At least 227 farms conducted various portions of their deer farm business with cash. Over the last three years, 1,222 deer died on farms for various reasons. Disease testing was not performed nor required on the majority of deer. Farmers reported doing business with people in 22 other states and one Canadian province. Click these links for more information

    http://www.cwd-info.org/index.php/fuseaction/news.detail/ID/4eb67da18ca2c69fce5b5f2eaad058e8

    Friday, February 03, 2012

    Wisconsin Farm-Raised Deer Farms and CWD there from 2012 report Singeltary et al

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/wisconsin-farm-raised-deer-farms-and.html

    *** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep. ...

    also, see where even decades back, the USDA had the same thought as they do today with CWD, not their problem...see page 27 below as well, where USDA stated back then, the same thing they stated in the state of Pennsylvania, not their damn business, once they escape, and they said the same thing about CWD in general back then ;

    ”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.

    http://collections.europarchive.org...www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

    ”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.

    sound familiar $$$

    Sunday, January 06, 2013

    USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE

    *** "it‘s no longer its business.”

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/01/usda-to-pgc-once-captives-escape-its-no.html

    THE LANCET Infectious Diseases Vol 3 August 2003

    Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America

    http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/laninf/PIIS1473309903007151.pdf?id=baa1CkXPkhI3Ih_Vlh6ru



    Saturday, March 29, 2014



    Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club



    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/game-farm-cwd-concerns-rise-at-boone.html





    snip...see full text ;



    Friday, April 04, 2014

    Wisconsin State officials kept silent on CWD discovery at game farm

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/04/wisconsin-state-officials-kept-silent.html
     
  2. wake up

    Time to wake up Wisconsinites----Its about time we ban these game farms, Should have never had them in the first place
     

  3. Steve

    Steve Staff Member

    Yeah, make you wonder how long people will put up with this nonsense.